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20100101
20100131
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
't have to continue. khzaei -- karzai was a great hope. everyone no knows him respected him. he might change his mind. the pressures that led him to permit and maybe support this corrupt structure could be reversed over time. the people up and down that structure might change their mind. the parliament is -- has stood up against his nominations. who's knows who's going to happen up and down that road. if we succeed in something that we can do, peter has pointed out the crucial important to the kandahar road. than doesn't be impossible to secure that. that changes the economic nature of southern afghanistan. it could get better. >> if i could just add one point. there's no question that the ghost of vietnam haunts this administration. i can tell you from being in it for 60 days. the ghost of what happened to lyndon johnson walks the corridors of this white house, it walks the corridors of this building every day. it's a mistake. we got to get over it. we got to stop fighting the vietnam war. i don't know whether we could have won or not, but it is not relevant to afghanistan. as marc p
, thereby taking the initial i.e.c. count to 54.-- 54 point something percent and having president karzai accept that, which i think was a good step for afghanistan. of course the runoff never happened but at least the e.c.c. was able to maintain its independence and show that the rule of law does matter to some degree in afghanistan. so with that, let me briefly introduce our three distinguished speakers and turn it over to them to speak just for a few minutes, probably no more than 10 minutes each if you can keep it to that, so we can have a frank and vibrant discussion and q&a session after that. to my far left, scott warden who just returned to the institute here. he's a senior rule advisor with usit, who was on a leave of absence to work as one of the three international members of the electoral complaints commission. he was also involved in the elections in 2005 for parliament when he was with the jdmb. you have their buy yows in front of you, i won't go into too much detail on that. isabel root is desk officer for the e.a.d. at the department of political affairs at the united nati
described where u.s. special operators blocked karzai's planned governor for kabul but she interweaves into it a very well written and interestingly -- history that is well written and well organized and -- and based on a lett of her own research with the original sources, a second reading -- rell important understanding of the country can be gotten from joel's book the opium season. and that details a year in which he was involved in a -- as a -- subcontractor in u.s. a.i.d. efforts in 2004 and 2005 to provide alternative livelihoods, to -- to draw away the work force from opium production. and it gives a great view of the violence and corruption and this complex tribal and world relations. and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic prove fit tiering and dysfunction that -- is -- is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war but in -- in development. a third source and it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is roshy stewart, wo within weeks after the fall of the taliban walked from iraq to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you. an
. they are the first combat casualties in afghanistan this year. afghan president hamid karzai has ordered parliament to postpone the winter recess until he announces a new list of cabinet nominees. last week, lawmakers rejected 17 of his 24 selections. well, some history was made last month in iraq. correspondent molly henneberg reports on a side of progress in the almost 7-year-old conflict. >> reporter: no u.s. troops died in combat operations in iraq in the month of december, military leaders say. the first month without combat fatality since the war started in 2003. >> that is a fairly significant milestone for us as we continue to move forward. i think it also speaks to the level of violence and how it's decreased over time. >> reporter: overall, combat deaths have been on the decline since may 2007 when 120 u.s. service men and women were killed. the second highest per month total since the beginning of the war. within a month, all of the additional 30,000 troops ordered by president bush to surge into iraq had arrived. the following april there were 40 combat deaths, the highest in 2008. 13 c
nominees for president karzai's cabinet. one of them was the only female nominee. what does this say about the is stability of afghanistan? >> reporter: it could say two things right now. it could say one, that the afghan government were not obviously happy with president karzai's choices. many parliamentarians have said he basically chose people who helped him during the campaign that he made promises to so he could get the presidency again. another way of looking at this, it's democracy in action. here you have the parliament who are turning down president karzai's choices. we should mention two weeks earlier when i asked the president at a press conference why he didn't have more female choices, he had only had one in his list, he conceded that he knew the parliament would reject a lot of his choices and he told me he expects to have more and more females within this cabinet and women throughout the government. >> brooke. >> an tillal, thank you. >>> we will take an inside look at what is being called the world's newest, tallest building. first though, our random moment in 90 seconds. >
to attack this plane head today america. >> afghanistan's parliament delivering a stinging blow to karzai, voting down 17-24. karzai said he will make new nominations, it's unclear when. in another high stakes political issue the chief of afghanistan as election commission says a parliamentary vote will be held in may despite widespread international concerns. north carolina is going smoke free. effective today the leading tobacco producing state is banning in restaurants and bars and relative late comers in the tobacco ban. becoming 29th ban in restaurants and 24th for bars. any smoker or establishment that refuses to obey the law will face stiff fines. that's are the latest stories, back to you. >> shannon: thank you, caroline. national association of is your ban hospitals are calling on members of to rethink regulations, especially cutting medicare payments. molly henneberg takes a look how tt affect hospitals treating low income patients. >> at howard university hospital in washington d.c., also a level one trauma center, about 20% of patients walk in the door uninsured. although many
. that's the same message we saw and heard in afghanistan with hamid karzai. these reluctant leaders that we, the united states, need. >> that's exactly right, tamron. we'll find the focus shifting from afghanistan to other potential sanctuaries, and in all of these cases we're dealing with teetering or failed states, weak governments, imperfect allies. but we have to work with them and find a way to partner with these imperfect friends and find a way to root out al qaeda within their countries, be much more aggressive with intelligence operations, because we're not going to be able to apply military forces to these places. >> i want to take that point directly to jim at the pentagon. jim, on that point as far as yemen, how much does our military, does our government, how much can we trust the yemeni government? >> there's not a whole lot of trust of the the ability of the yemen government, you know, they do feel at this point that the yemen government is sincere in trying to take down, or at least diminish the effectiveness of al qaeda in yemen itself. it's also dealing with a civil
by afghan president hamid karzai is viewed as one of the most corrupt in the world and building the capacity for a functioning government and build up police and military so they can over the course of the next 18 to 24 months take control, take responsibility for the security situation here. julie. >> julie: connor powell, thank you. closer to home now, mexico announcing the capture of an alleged drug lord from a notoriously violent gang south of the bore they are. carlos dell tran l. vechlt a, carrying two guns and ammo and a false driver's license. he was nabbed on wednesday and waiting to disclose his arrest. his older and powerful brother was killed in a shootout with mexican troops. arturo beltran was the reputed treat of the beltran leva cartel. his taking down one of the highest in the mexican government's fight against drug gangs. a plane slides off a runway in germany, and collides in turkey, as we go around the world in 80 seconds. turkey, a passenger train crashing head-on into another train. the collision in northwestern turkey killing one of the engine drivers and injuring at
as a combination of president musharraf and hamid karzai. he's a man who rules with an iron fist. his forces are killing his own people. he does not tolerate religious minorities. on the other side, he has an incredibly corrupt administration. so in some ways, he embodies the worst of both pakistan and afghanistan's leaders. >> what do you make of our sending back people over there for rehabilitation? i mean, one of the handlers of the attacker on christmas day was apparently sent back with the theory that he had been rehabilitated through art training. >> yes, he had been sent to saudi arabia, and saudi arabia has a rehabilitation program that gets quite high marks from people from independent observers, people in this country who have taken a close look at it. there's always going to be a few people who fall through, a few people who escape, if you like, the system. it's clear some of these people are turning up. saudi arabia, keep in mind, has been cracking down on al qaeda and its own borders, and a lot of those people have been fleeing across the borders to yemen. so the situation in ye
karzai and with his cabinet on numerous occasions, notably with the trip that hillary clinton and i had made to afghanistan on october 18 and 19 in conjunction with the inauguration. the afghans understood this, they are very comfortable with it. so i need to underscore that's what july 2011 means. not a withdraw, but the start of a responsibility transition in which american combat troops will begin to draw down. on the second question and in regard to pakistan, i'm not sure quite how you phrase it. strobe, you made a generic comment? >> mike hamlin and his colleagues have put together a set of bench marks on sort of how things are going. and the trend that they feel they have identified in pakistan is ominous, negative by comparison with a year ago. >> yeah. i read mike's monthly, it's quarterly, actually, isn't it? i read mike's quarterly table with great interest. and it helped -- influenced me a lot as we tried to develop our own benchmarks. but i think we have to be very careful about two things. maybe three things. one, let's not confuse input and output. it's a very common probl
led by afghan president hamid karzai, which is widely seen as one of the most corrupt governments in the world. also to build up the afghan security forces so that the government and police and army are capable of taking over control of afghanistan in the next 18 to 24 months. but in many ways, jamie, it's the second part of the mcchrystal strategy, ability of the afghan government and security forces that will be the most difficult part of the plan here in afghanistan, jamie. >> jamie: connor powell, live for us in kabul. connor, stay safe. thanks. >> eric: some are asking this morning is it time to lock the door at gitmo? with yemen clearly an al-qaeda hotbed, should the bam ball administra obama administration adjust plans for gitmo? the 200 detainees are from yemen and some have returned to yemen and authorities say one is al-qaeda's number two there. so with the troubles in the country right now, is this really the best time for them to be sent home? joining us now is cullly simpson, legal fellow at the heritage foundation and former deputy assistant secretary for defense for
for hamid karzai says the leader is surprised by the rejection of most of his cabinet choices. he will submit new choices for the cabinet but is not clear when that will happen. the rejection will delay efforts to establish a functioning government. >>> president obama ordered 30,000 additional troops into afghanistan this year. will that provide the stability the country needs or trigger an increase in violence? conor powell in kabul with the latest from afghanistan. good to see you, corner. >>> well, shannon, talking to analysts first on the military and on the civilian side there seems to be a broad consensus that the violence will continue to get worse in 2010. that there will be more bloodshed and simply more deaths but 2009 was a record year and there is this fear that this will be a much worse year. general mcchris tollway said before things get better here on the found in afghanistan things will get worse but phrased that as part of the process of improving and stablizing afghanistan. there are more american and international troops and more afghan troops on the way and be
and eventual victory by hamid karzai. they discuss the presidential elections for this may. it was held at the u.s. institute of peace in washington, d.c. >> good morning, everyone. we can proceed. thank everyone for coming. my name is john dempsey with the u.s. institute of peace, based in afghanistan. i have the privilege of actually being here in washington this week for this, our first public event on afghanistan of 2010. i'm so happy we have such a good turnout, i recognize some faces here, see a lot of people i haven't seen around before and i look forward to a frank discussion with our distinguished panelist today on a subject that clearly has been getting a lot of attention over the last year, given what we saw in the difficult election season in afghanistan last year but that also has not yet gone away. i think once we got through the difficult process of the elections last year, people were breathing a collective sigh of relief that we moved on and could actually get on with governance and moving toward with strategic objectives in the country, but yet, we have another electio
blocked karzai's plan to governor for kabul. she interweaves a very well- written and interestingly a history that is a well-written, well-organized and based on her own research with original sources. a second really important understanding of the country can be gotten from the book "the opium season," which details a year in which he was involved as a -- a subcontractor in u.s.a.i.d. efforts in 2004-2005 to provide alternative livelihood's to draw with a workforce from opium production. it gives a view of the violence, tribal and warlord relations, and moreover, it shows the bureaucratic profiteering and dysfunction that is increasing the complexity and cost of our involvement, not just in war, but in development. a third source, and i think it is outstanding if you want to understand the country is stored, who within weeks after the fall of the taliban locked to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to kill you -- what to kabul in the winter, which is supposed to value and described the bill which experience in a week -- and described that experience in a way in which any develo
counts of first degree murder. afghanistan's parliament is rejecting 17 of president hamid karzai's 24 cabinet nominees and says that he has to make new selections. the head of the u.n. mission in afghanistan is calling the ruling a setback that will delay efforts to get a functioning government up and running. officials say karzai will now have to spend political energy nominating new choices when the country should be focused on needed reform. >> didn't take them because they're corrupt. >> really. >> this is' heavy snow falling in salem, massachusetts and some strong winds, let's get a check on all of this from rick reichmuth in the weather center. >> the northeast has been pummelled with more wind and snow and that area of low pressure, the downer clock-wise circulation has gotten so wound up. warm air across the north side of that. bangor maine, 36 degrees. burlington vermont, 10 degrees. cold air across the eastern two-thirds of the country. if you want warm temps go far out towards the west and the satellite radar picture for us is going to be continuing to show a little bit of
be accomplished? >> yes. yes, sir. >> president karzai is headed to the afghan conference in london this week, and he is saying that he is when asked for that names of some taliban people to be taken off the u.n. sanctions list in return for them laying down their arms and countenancing talks. is this something the white house would be prepared to look at? >> i would simply say that you have heard general petreaus, added his efforts in iraq, discuss similar type efforts in afghanistan at political reconciliation. you have heard general mcchrystal discuss the same thing. so obviously a similar path to what happened in a rack each of those two individuals have talked through. again, provided that whoever this is accepts the afghan constitution, renounces violence, and publicly breaks with groups that advocate violence. that is what people except -- expect under the notion of reconciliation. >> first on afghanistan as well. last week the u.n. put out a report saying that the amount of graft and kickbacks in afghanistan is about $2.3 billion a year, about 25% of their gross domestic product. who
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)